Picture Framing Online: Things To Know

When you look deeper into a picture once clicked by you, you will understand that a frame alone can bring drastic changes to the otherwise simple photograph. Choose frames very selectively, as they hold the power to entirely transform an ordinary picture into something spectacular and out of the world. Picture framing online has changed the very definition of frames and photographs. Internet has made online shopping easy, simple and affordable. So, if you are looking for custom picture frames in the most competitive prices then you must scroll through the online websites filled with striking frames and related details.

Shopping is fun anytime, whatever you are looking for. Buying online photo frames has become a latest trend that youngsters like to follow in order to make their home look warm and gorgeous. Vibrant frames on walls and nooks and corners instantly lift up the moods of the people living there. So, what you have to do is look for online deals near your area and grab the most suitable offer. Though youngsters are the ones who are mostly attracted to the frames, people from all age groups can shop for frames to glam up their boring home dcor. The ones who are living away from home can get homesick and want to decorate a corner of their new house with customised photo frames, so for them here is some really great news!

Picture framing online websites are awesome to look for fabulous set of frames of all designs and shapes. In these online sites, you will find a huge collection with budget. Even you can customise a frame for yourself on for someone whom you want to gift one. With just a quick search, you will come to discover thousands and thousands online framing service providers who excels in selling a variety of stunning frames within budget range. If you want, you can also directly communicate with the reputable company’s framing designers to get customised packages.
When it comes to frames, you can choose larger ones or the smaller ones. The large frames are mostly needed for big family photographs. Suppose, the photograph that you have is above 18″ by 18″ then it is will be better to consider a larger frame. By going with a smaller frame, you will simply ruin the entire picture and thus the wall dcor. Now, when you have a smaller version of a picture then you can easily look for smaller frames that cost considerably lesser. A smaller picture doesn’t need a larger frame, so depending on the picture size, you must choose the frames.
If you are sceptical to rely on a particular custom picture frames online company then ask friends and family to recommend companies from where they have previously bought services. Or read the testimonials and review sections to get an idea of the company with which you are dealing.

How Body Piercing Works — The Ins and Outs of this Cutting Edge Process

Body piercing (defined as any piercing beyond the standard earlobe piercing) has become such a popular form of body modification that between five and ten percent of the population of the United States has indulged in at least one form of it at some time in their lives. In most cases, once a person gets a body piercing, they follow the first one with more. There are lots of considerations; however, for making sure that your body piercing is done safely so that you don’t end up with either an infection or a poorly done piercing that could leave an unsightly scar.

It ain’t ear piercing, honey…

The procedure for a good body piercing isn’t the same is for getting your earlobes pierced. Most earlobe piercings that you see done in a mall or jewelry store involve using a piercing gun that quickly shoots the actual earring post through the earlobe. This may be fine for an area of the body that has soft tissue and is easily pierced, but it isn’t a good idea for other parts of the body for a few reasons.

First, it isn’t as accurate as a needle, so lining it up won’t always work. Just as with any gun, there is a recoil that will make the aim inaccurate. Second, the force of the gun will cause bruising and damage to the skin that isn’t necessary and will slow the healing process. Third, a piercing gun can’t be sterilized completely, so there is a higher risk of infection. The message is clear — never get a body piercing done with a piercing gun. Always go to a professional who follows procedures approved by the Association of Professional Piercers (APP).

Once you get to the piercing parlor, there are several steps to the body piercing process that will take place to ensure both the success of the piercing and your health and safety. Each of these steps should be followed and nothing skipped.

Getting the preliminaries out of the way

You must be comfortable in the environment and comfortable with your piercer before moving ahead with anything. If he or she attempts to rush you through the procedure without answering your questions or putting you at ease, do not continue. This is a long-term commitment you are making, so it’s up to you if you want to go through with it.

There is paperwork to be filled out, and don’t let a piercing parlor tell you otherwise. A good piercing studio always keeps accurate records to ensure the health and safety of their clients. If there would ever be a question of contamination or some other health hazard, they must be able to contact you. If you are a minor, they must have the signature of your parent or guardian, who must be present at the time of the piercing.

Sterilization — the only route to safe body piercing

Sterilization is all-important in body piercing — the piercing area must be sterile, the piercer’s hands must be sterile, the tools used must be sterile, and the piercing needle must be sterile.

A separate area for sterilization should be available in the piercing parlor where a steam heat autoclave is operational. The autoclave is the only approved sterilization device that can sufficiently heat tools such as forceps to a high enough temperature to kill all bacteria. Before beginning any piercing, all tools will be sterilized in an autoclave and laid out carefully on a clean tray. After this, they will not be touched until your piercing begins, and then only by your piercer when he has safely cleaned and gloved his hands, just as a surgeon would.

You can’t be too clean

The piercing chair or table will also be cleaned, usually by being wiped down thoroughly with an antibacterial spray and disposable cloths or paper towels to prevent recontamination. You will not be allowed to enter and prepare for your piercing until the area has been prepped and sterilized.

The needles used for body piercing are sterile and individually packaged, and no reputable piercer will ever use a needle that has already been used once. When you are pierced, the sterile needle’s package should be opened in your presence just before your piercing. The same is true of your starter jewelry — it should be sealed in sterile packaging and only opened in your presence.

The piercer will wash his hands and wrists with an antibacterial liquid soap and dry them before donning disposable gloves. At this point, he will be ready to begin your piercing.

Prep work means straight piercings and fewer complications

With properly gloved hands, your piercer will first check the area you want pierced to determine if you are really a candidate for the type of body piercing you’re seeking. In some cases, he may tell you that the conditions aren’t appropriate.

For instance, if there is damage to the cartilage or heavy scarring in the area you want pierced. He will also tell you if you have a current cut or skin condition that means you should postpone piercing. If this is the case, in order to protect your health and prevent possible problems down the line, he will not go any farther with the procedure. If everything looks fine, he’ll tell you so and you’ll move on to the next step.

He’ll change to a fresh pair of gloves after having handled your skin to examine the area.
He will clean the area to be pierced with an antibacterial solution.
He will mark the area to be pierced with a sterile, disposable marker.
You’ll have the opportunity to check the marking (in a mirror if necessary) before he proceeds to the piercing stage.
He will ask you if you are ready for the piercing procedure and allow you a moment to get comfortable.
He will arrange his tools at hand and open the sterile package with the piercing needle.

And now, you’re ready for the real deal — the piercing itself!

But first, a word about those piercing needles…

Piercing needles are not your average sewing needle or push-pin. Piercing needles are highly specialized and were designed specifically to pierce the flesh while causing the least amount of pain possible. They also help encourage faster and cleaner healing than a regular needle.

These needles also come in a variety of gauges suited for specific types of piercings. For instance, if you are getting a nipple pierced, the piercer will probably not want to use anything smaller than a 12 gauge (the smaller the gauge, the larger the needle), while a lip or nostril could be pierced with a 14 or 16 gauge. Thicker gauges prevent migration in areas prone to this movement of the jewelry, and prevent tear-out of piercings in more delicate flesh.

Piercing needles are made from surgical steel — the same material that hospital scalpels and lancets are made from. This ensures that they are biocompatible with all skin types and won’t cause an allergic reaction. They are also extremely sharp because they are laser cut with precision edges so that they slice cleanly through the skin without tearing or pulling. The piercing needles are hollow rather than solid so that they actually cut a tiny hole through the skin being pierced rather than punching through the skin.

These hollow needles leave a clean-edged, precise hole in the flesh that will heal relatively quickly, while a regular needle (which is much duller by comparison) actually pushes its way through the skin, tearing and bruising the skin along the way.

This is why a professional piercing needle provides a much less painful piercing with minimal bruising, and is much safer and easier for your body.

The main event — the body piercing

The basic procedure is the same for most piercings, but all piercers have their own way of handling the process. Some piercers will clamp the area with forceps to stabilize the area before putting the needle through, while others prefer to use a steady hand and their own eyes to guide the needle. If the person being pierced seems like they may flinch, it is more likely the forceps or surgical pliers of some type will be used to steady the area and hold the skin in place. This doesn’t hurt, and is simply to make sure you don’t get a crooked placement.

When the needle is lined up with the marking, the piercer will ask one last time if you are ready, and then quickly push the needle through. Some piercers use a cork as a backing, others don’t. This usually only takes a moment and feels like someone is pinching the skin hard. In most cases, the build-up to the moment is far worse than the actual piercing. Areas that are more sensitive include the genital area and the bridge of the nose.

Starter jewelry needs to be high quality

After the needle is removed, the starter jewelry is immediately put into place. One of the most important things to know about starter jewelry is that it is being put into an open wound, which is what a fresh piercing really is. Obviously, you don’t want your starter jewelry to be something that can cause an allergic reaction or infection.

There are three materials recognized by professional piercers as acceptable for starter jewelry for their high quality, purity and their low incidence of allergic reactions:

Surgical Steel
Titanium
14K or 18K gold

Other materials are more likely to cause either an allergic reaction, rejection of the piercing by your body, or migration of the piercing.

Starter jewelry is generally a captive bead ring or barbell. The piercer will choose an appropriate size for the area that is slightly larger than what you would normally wear to allow for some swelling, which is normal for the first several days after a new piercing. He will screw the ends onto the new jewelry and make sure it is securely in place.

At this point, the piercer will remove this set of gloves and put on another fresh set, clean the area around the new piercing and examine it one last time. He will let you take a look at your new body jewelry while he explains the aftercare and any potential problems you should watch for. He will also give you a sheet of detailed aftercare instructions to take home with you.

Before you leave, take a few moments to relax either in the piercing room or the waiting room, as sometimes the adrenalin rush and its aftermath can leave you feeling a bit light-headed. Once you feel steady and sure of yourself, it is a good idea to get something like fruit juice to drink or a light snack. Your piercing is done!

What if I want to try body piercing myself?

If you love body modification, you may be considering piercing yourself. It’s really not a good idea for a number of reasons. If you want to try piercing, do it the right way — become a fully trained, licensed professional. Without the proper training and an understanding of proper sterilization techniques you risk scarring, infection, and permanent damage to the area.

Using makeshift piercing tools like sewing needles is also a great risk because they simply cannot be sterilized properly. Even heating over an open flame (such as a lighter) will not kill all bacteria. The only guaranteed way to kill all germs is with an autoclave or by using packaged, sterile surgical needles. Even then, the entire area and all tools must be sterilized properly.

If you are truly interested in piercing, consider it not as a hobby or a momentary activity but as a career. Becoming an apprentice at a piercing parlor means learning proper technique and learning a trade at the same time, combining your interests with a way to make a living.

What are the Real Risks of Body Piercing? — Advice for Parents & Teens

Are you or your teenager considering a body piercing? Is it difficult to see eye-to-eye on this subject, or are you just not sure what the real risks of body piercing are? Sometimes it’s hard to separate the facts from the myths surrounding body modification. When that happens, it can make it even harder for parents and teenagers to come to an agreement on whether a body piercing is an acceptable form of self-expression.

First, you should understand that the risks of body piercing are very real. There are genuine problems that can and do arise, and these shouldn’t be ignored. On the other hand, by taking certain precautions and taking proper care of your piercings, you can minimize your chance of having a problem and greatly increase the chances that you will be one of the millions of people who will end up with a healthy, normal piercing.

What are the health risks of body piercing?

Infection. Without proper care, infection can lead to scarring and even blood poisoning. Infections of piercings are unattractive and can be very dangerous.
Allergic Reaction. Some people are sensitive to certain metals and only discover this when they are pierced and have a severe reaction to the jewelry. The rash, swelling, and difficulty breathing can lead to shock and hospitalization.
Nerve Damage. If a piercing isn’t placed carefully, it can be pushed through a nerve, severing it and making the surrounding area permanently deadened to any feeling.
Excessive Bleeding. This is just what it sounds like. If you get pierced and happen to hit a large blood vessel, you could have difficulty stopping the bleeding and may end up in the emergency room getting it cauterized. Not pretty.
Risk of Cross-Contamination. You may become cross-contaminated by Hepatitis, the HIV virus, or another blood-borne pathogen is you are pierced by improperly sterilized needles.
Keloids. These are toughened knots of scar tissue that look like cysts at the base of a piercing that sometimes form for no reason at the site of a piercing.
Can’t donate blood. Is it important for you to be a blood donor? Is there someone in your family who is ill and may need blood donations in the near future? Don’t get pierced. You cannot donate blood for one year after getting pierced — no exceptions.
Dental Risks. There are several problems that can arise from oral piercings, including chipped teeth, worn tooth enamel, damage to the gums and jaw line from wear, and even aspiration (inhaling) of a loose piece of jewelry into the lungs. Infection and swelling of the tongue is also a possibility, and is very unpleasant.

Are there other body piercing risks?

It depends on what you consider a risk. There are certainly things you should consider that you could call potential drawbacks to getting pierced. Among these are:

Pain. How much of a weenie are you? If you can’t tolerate pain, you may be risking suffering more than you like for your vanity. Some piercings hardly hurt at all, others can be pretty rough for a few weeks.
Cost. Do you have the money to pay not only for the piercing and jewelry, but for the aftercare products, such as Provon® or Satin® and H2Ocean®?
Commitment. You are putting yourself at risk if you can’t clean your piercing every day, twice a day. Period. End of discussion. And you have to do your sea salt soaks or H2Ocean® treatments without fail.
Judgment of Others. Let’s get real. You may not want to hear this one, but face it; others may judge you based on your piercings, so really think this one through. Will it bother you if others stare as though they are afraid of you? Do you want to have to explain yourself or remove your piercing for job interviews? Will you feel badly if your piercing upsets your grandparents or family friends?

Okay, we’ve looked at the risks of body piercing, and you (or your teenager) are still certain that a piercing is a “must have.” How do you prevent all of those scary possibilities we mentioned in our list of health risks? By doing your homework! A good piercing with a low risk of infection or other complications is the result of choosing a good, professional piercer and having the piercing done in the proper environment.

What should you look for in a piercing parlor that will reduce the risks of body piercing?

First impressions count! When you walk in the door, scan the waiting area. Is it clean, neat and professional looking? If the front of the shop isn’t clean, it’s a sure thing that they can’t keep the back area clean. If you first impression makes you wary, turn around and walk out the door.

Credentials

Check to make sure they are licensed by the local board of health to operate as a piercing studio, and make sure their license hasn’t expired. Also look for membership in a recognized group such as the Association of Professional Piercers (APP), which sets high standards for membership and requires extensive training. An APP certification will indicate that the piercers have taken classes and been through a rigorous apprenticeship program.

Helpful, Knowledgeable Staff

Ask questions, and lots of them. If the employees don’t know the answers and are more like sales clerks pushing jewelry than anything, you should be wary. They may have a high turn-over of staff for some reason; this is also a red flag. If, however, they can answer your piercing questions and give you good, clear advice, then they have been well-trained by someone with experience.

The one exception may be if the studio is very large and they have a few sales people who only work the front counters. If this is the case and you begin asking questions, they should answer honestly that they are salespeople, and be willing to refer you to a piercer or apprentice who can discuss your concerns with you. There should always be a piercer on location at the studio or parlor when it is open — always.

Printed information

Ask to see the aftercare information they provide to individuals getting pierced. If you hear, “Oh, your piercer will explain all that to you,” insist on seeing the printed version before getting pierced. If they don’t have printed, step-by-step instructions, walk away. It is too easy to forget what you need to do, forget the name of the product you should be using, etc. if you don’t have printed instructions. If they aren’t willing to spend the money to print the instructions for their clients, who knows where else they might be cutting corners!

Read through the aftercare instructions and see if they are current with the prevailing standards. A good way to evaluate this is by checking them against what you see on sites such as BME, Tribalectic and APP. If the piercing literature still recommends using alcohol or hydrogen peroxide, for instance, to clean your piercing, then the studio is not keeping up with the current research in body piercing care and may cause you unnecessary suffering and longer healing times.

The rules are there for a reason

If you’re a teenager and they don’t ask for I.D. or tell you to come back with a parent or guardian, do not thank your lucky stars. Leave! The law says your parent has to be present, and any studio that bends or breaks the rules on one issue will do the same on others.

In other words, if they are willing to “ignore” one rule to grab your money, they will ignore others to turn a higher profit. They may decide that the expense of an autoclave is unnecessary, or that reusing piercing needles is a great way to save some money. You are a minor and have little or no protection without your parents present, and they know this — that’s why they do it — to take advantage of you, pure and simple. If you are going to get pierced, make sure you take a parent or guardian with you for your own safety. If they’ve been cool enough to get this far with you, they’ll survive going to a piercing parlor, trust me.

The rest of the place

We’ve made it past the waiting room and decided that the piercing parlor seems okay so far; they have current credentials and health certificates, their aftercare instructions look good, and they had Dad sign a consent form. Are we ready to go? Not yet. You still need to check a few more things. Don’t be afraid to interrogate them about the piercing room and the sterilization process itself. These are two of the most important things to consider.

Ask these questions before ever getting pierced:

Do you sterilize your tools in an autoclave? May I see your most recent spore test results? If they don’t do spore testing at least once a month, don’t get pierced there. Spore testing is the only way to know if an autoclave is effectively sterilizing the equipment, and autoclave sterilization is the only method approved by the Association of Professional Piercers.
How long have you been piercing, and how did you learn? Body piercing is complex, and any piercer who is a professional will gladly explain where he learned and from whom. It takes quite a while to learn what types of jewelry and needles are best for each piercing and to learn how to place the piercings optimally. If a piercer seems defensive or less than forthcoming, be hesitant to let him touch you with a needle.
May I see the room where you’ll be doing the piercing, and can I watch you set up? Check out the area where the piercings are done. Do they wipe down the area before and after every piercing? Do they maintain a clean, dust free environment at all times? When setting up, make sure that the sterilized instruments are put on a tray and not touched except with washed, gloved hands. Make sure the piercer uses gloves for the entire piercing and changes them frequently.
What type of piercing needles do you use? There is only one correct answer: Single-use, pre-sterilized, disposable needles. These should not be opened except in your presence at the time of the piercing. If they use a piercing gun for any piercing, leave immediately. No body piercing should ever be done with a piercing gun, which causes bruising, trauma and excessive tearing and bleeding.

“I’ve chosen the parlor and piercer and I got a really cool body piercing. Now what?”

AFTERCARE!!! There is nothing as crucial to addressing the risks of body piercing as properly following the guidelines for piercing aftercare. Since you’ve chosen a reliable, professional piercer, you will have a set of aftercare instructions that will tell you what to do to properly care for your piercings.

Do not skip a day because you are too tired, too busy, or because you “forget.” Aftercare is literally preventative care — you are taking care of your piercing in order to prevent an infection and to enable the wound to heal properly. While following your aftercare instructions, watch for signs of trouble so that you can address them early on before they turn into real problems.

Signs of a potential problem that you should bring to the attention of your parents (if you are a minor) or your piercer are:

Discharge that is green or yellow from the piercing
Splitting, oozing or cracking and bleeding of a piercing more than a week old
Swelling and redness after the first few days
Pain and redness or red streaks radiating out from the piercing
Migration (movement of the piercing) up through the layers of skin
Difficulty breathing and swelling of the tongue within hours of a piercing, especially an oral piercing
A rash or hives soon after a piercing
A lump or bump forming at the base of the piercing

In some cases, you will need to see a doctor; in others your piercer will be able to advise you on the proper steps to alleviate the situation. The important thing is to catch any small problems before they turn into big ones. If you follow your aftercare instructions and monitor your piercing carefully, you can minimize the risks of body piercing so that you can enjoy your new body piercing completely!

This article “What are the Real Risks of Body Piercing?” reprinted with permission.
Copyright © 2004 Evaluseek Publishing.